Skip to main content
Home »

News

Why Does Outdoor Time Delay Or Prevent Myopia?

outdoor children 640Now that myopia (nearsightedness) is reaching epidemic proportions across the globe, it’s all the more important for parents to understand how myopia can impact their child’s future, and learn which actions they should take to protect their child’s eye health in the long run.

You see, myopia isn’t simply an inconvenience. Childhood myopia raises the risk of developing vision-robbing diseases like macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy later in life.

Myopia develops as the eye elongates more than it should, causing light to focus in front of the retina instead of directly on it. This manifests as blurred distance vision and clear near vision.

While myopia is caused by a combination of circumstances, including genetic and environmental, a key factor comes down to the amount of time a child spends outdoors in the sunlight.

How Does Outdoor Play Affect Myopia?

Although researchers haven’t yet pinpointed exactly why “sun time” prevents or delays myopia, almost all agree that it plays a large role.

One possible reason is correlated to the brightness of the sun. Some experts have found that the intensity of the sun’s rays triggers a dopamine release in the retina which is thought to slow down the elongation of the eye.

Another theory holds that outdoor time encourages a child to shift their gaze from near objects to faraway ones. Excessive near work, like staring at a digital screen, is believed to be a driving force behind the stark increase in myopic individuals today.

Sending a child outdoors to play gives their eyes a break from focusing on their tablets, smartphones, homework, gaming and other near work.

Additionally, spending more time in the sunshine means more Vitamin-D production. Small-scale studies have found nearsighted people have lower levels of Vitamin D than those with normal eyesight. However, more research is needed to confirm this theory.

Here’s the Bottom Line

Childhood myopia increases the risk of developing sight-threatening eye diseases later in life. Parents should be proactive about their child’s eye health and do what they can to prevent myopia from developing or progressing at a rapid rate.

Even if your child doesn’t have myopia, encouraging them to play outdoors for several hours a day has been found to prevent the onset of myopia in certain instances.

So go ahead and give your child a water bottle, sunscreen, a pair of sunglasses—and send them out to play! Children aged 6 and up should spend about 2 hours daily outside in the sunshine.

But sun time alone isn’t enough to ensure the best possible outcome for their eye health. A myopia management program can help give your child the best odds of healthy vision for a lifetime.

To learn more about the myopia treatments we offer and schedule your child’s myopia consultation, call EyeCare Associates today!

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Randy Schulman

Q: #1: What is myopia management?

  • A: Myopia management is the science-based method used to slow or halt the progression of myopia. There are several options available, and your optometrist will sit down with you and your child to discuss which treatment option is most suitable for your child’s needs.

Q: #2: Who can benefit from myopia management?

  • A: Myopia management treatments have been approved for children as young as 8 and can be used until early adulthood. Myopia management is great for children with low myopia but can also be effective for slowing myopia progression in kids and teens with moderate to high myopia. Contact us to find out whether your child is a candidate for myopia management.

EyeCare Associates serves patients from Trumbull, Southport, Norwalk and Stamford, all throughout Connecticut.

 

Book An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Masks Can Cause Dry Eye Symptoms

How do masks lead to dry eyes?

The phenomenon of masks leading to dry eye is so widespread that a name for the condition has already been coined by some eye care providers: “Mask-associated dry eye,” or “MADE.” At our eye clinic near you, we’ve been seeing an increasing number of patients who visit due to stinging eyes, redness, and blurred vision – all classic signs of dry eye syndrome. While dry eye syndrome has always been a common reason to book an appointment with our optometrist near you, what’s new is that the dry eye symptoms seem to be caused by wearing masks.

How can you prevent your mask from causing dry eye irritation? near you in Trumbull, Connecticut

The phenomenon of masks leading to dry eye is so widespread that a name for the condition has already been coined by some eye care providers: “Mask-associated dry eye,” or “MADE.” At our eye clinic near you, we’ve been seeing an increasing number of patients who visit due to stinging eyes, redness and blurred vision – all classic signs of dry eye syndrome. While dry eye syndrome has always been a common reason to book an appointment with our optometrist near you, what’s new is that the dry eye symptoms seem to be caused by wearing masks.

If you’re wearing a mask and eyeglasses, every time you breathe it fogs up your lenses. Then they defog, only to fog up again with your next breath. Steamed-up glasses and the onset of dry eye symptoms is an emerging condition to be aware of. The main reason for promoting awareness of MADE is not to encourage anyone to stop wearing a mask, but rather, it’s to help people manage the eye irritation that may result – while continuing to don face masks.

When you breathe, you expel air over the top of your mask. This air flows over the surface of your eyes and can dry out the tear film that coats and lubricates your eye surface. It also speeds evaporation of tears.

In general, our eye doctor near you has found that mask wearing doesn’t trigger the onset of dry eye syndrome in people who don’t have it. Instead, it can worsen symptoms in people who already have the condition or are at high risk for it – such as people who spend a lot of time staring at computer screens. Nowadays, with all the working-from-home and Zoom meetings that occur, most people fall into the category of “at risk” for dry eye syndrome.

  • Make sure your mask fits properly. A poorly fitting face covering increases the chances that exhaled air escapes from the top opening and flows over your eyes. Push the metal strip at the top margin of your mask so it fits snugly over the contour of your nose and cheekbones, blocking airflow.
  • Avoid rubbing your eyes. This habit can lead to a long list of problems, including micro-scratches in your cornea and swelling that can exacerbate the symptoms.
  • Don’t ignore dry eye symptoms. Pay attention to how your eyes feel and seek effective treatment, such as lubricating eye drops, from our optometrist near you.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Pink Eye or conjunctivitis Myopia or Nearsightedness , Astigmatism , Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Trumbull eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Book an eye exam at EyeCare Associates eye clinic near you in Trumbull, Connecticut to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you. Call 203-457-8799

EyeCare Associates, your Trumbull eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US

  • My eyes are always burning and tired, what is causing this and what can I do about it?

    These are often signs of dry eye syndrome, a very common condition that affects many people over time. Women are generally more prone to developing these symptoms and aging is often a cause as well. Dryness of our eyes is often due to a decrease in the oil production in our eyelid glands which causes the surface of the eye to become irritated. Certain medications and health issues can also contribute to dryness. There is no true cure for dryness but many treatments are available such as the use of artificial tears, nutritional supplements incorporating Omega 3, prescription medications such as Restasis, and eyelid hygiene. No single treatment works for every individual so we customize treatments for each person and their specific condition.

  • What are the typical treatments used to help people suffering from Dry Eyes?

    Treatment for dry eye varies due to the severity and stage of the disease. Artificial tears can be helpful in the early stages. If artificial tears are not sufficient, we progress to a prescription medication such as Restasis or Xiidra. Also, lid hygiene, as well as omega-3 fish oil supplementation, can improve symptoms. Anti-inflammatory medications as well as punctal plugs are also available if needed for treatment.

  • Are there any day to day activities that can cause Dry Eye?

    Certainly, age, gender, and medications can be causative factors, but so can the work environment (dry offices or factories), weather/seasons, and
 geographical location.

  • How do I know if I have Dry Eye?

    These are often signs of dry eye syndrome, a very common condition that affects many people over time. Women are generally more prone to developing these symptoms and aging is often a cause as well. Dryness of our eyes is often due to a decrease in the oil production in our eyelid glands which causes the surface of the eye to become irritated. Certain medications and health issues can also contribute to dryness. There is no true cure for dryness but many treatments are available such as the use of artificial tears, nutritional supplements incorporating Omega 3, prescription medications such as Restasis, and eyelid hygiene. No single treatment works for every individual so we customize treatments for each person and their specific condition.

My Child Has Myopia—Now What?

Trouble seeing the board at school, frequent squinting, complaints of headaches, a rising amount of screen time—whatever prompted you to schedule an eye appointment for your child, it was clear: something was wrong. Next, you learn that your child has myopia or nearsightedness. What do you do now?

First, it’s important that you do something.

That may seem obvious, but it’s important to underscore here because that hasn’t always been the case with myopia. Myopia, more commonly known as nearsightedness, often meant glasses with continually higher prescriptions as the condition progressed and vision declined. CooperVision’s myopia simulator can give you a glimpse of what that progression looks like through the eyes of a child. Perhaps that was even your own experience. Since then, the world’s understanding of myopia has developed, and the necessary technology alongside it. Now we can do something to slow the progression of myopia and we must.

Not only does slowing the progression of myopia help preserve your child’s vision, it keeps their eyes healthier and at less risk for serious eye conditions later on such as cataracts, glaucoma and retinal detachment, all conditions that can lead to visual impairment and even blindness. Fortunately, you have options to support your child’s eye health and keep their future bright.

In our practice, we can walk you through myopia management options, including CooperVision’s Brilliant Futures™ Myopia Management Program with MiSight®1 day contact lenses. Together, we can explore what will be the best fit for your child, their preferences, and their lifestyle. We’re very excited that we’re certified to offer MiSight®1 day, the first and only daily soft contact lens FDA approved* to slow the progression of myopia in children, aged 8-12 at the initiation of treatment. It’s a simple and safe solution that works for many lifestyles, as well as being proven to slow myopia progression by about 59% on average. To top it off, research also tells us that compared to children in glasses, children in contact lenses report better quality of life, especially for recreational activities and their self-perceived appearance.

We believe that kids should grow stronger, but their nearsightedness shouldn’t. Contact our practice to schedule a time for a conversation about myopia and your options to support your child’s eye health.

Call One of Our 4 Locations
Schedule an Eye Exam

Exercise Helps Keep Your Eyes in Shape Too!

EyeCare Associates An Active Body is Linked to Healthy Eyes near you in Trumbull, Connecticut

You know all about how regular exercise strengthens your heart and lungs, as well as boosts your energy. Did you also know it can promote healthy vision? Remember, your body is one interconnected unit, and every organ benefits from getting a workout. Our Eye doctor near you in Trumbull, Connecticut explains how physical activity helps to preserve your quality vision.

The Importance of Preventive Health Care near you in Trumbull, Connecticut

A variety of scientific studies have confirmed that regular exercise can reduce the risks of common eye diseases, such as glaucoma, cataracts, and age-related macular degeneration. The effects of exercise on your quality of life are therefore far-reaching, helping to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Sharp vision is intricately connected to your physical and mental health, enabling you to work and enjoy all the activities you love to do.

When assessing risk factors for ocular disease, eye care providers focus on a holistic view of the person. Eye health can be related to your overall health, with conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes being risk factors for vision loss.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Pink Eye or conjunctivitis, Myopia or Nearsightedness , Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Trumbull eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

How Much Exercise Is Recommended?

At our eye clinic near you in Trumbull, Connecticut, patients constantly ask about the bottom line: how much is enough exercise to reap the eye health benefits? According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, you don’t need to run a marathon. Leading an active lifestyle, such as taking brisk walks, climbing up the stairs instead of using the elevator, and dancing can have a positive impact on eye health. In many cases, these types of exercise are enough to help lower blood pressure and keep blood sugars in control, which in turn helps prevent vision damage.

The Importance of Preventive Health Care

  • Along with exercising and maintaining a healthy, nutritious diet, the team at our eye care center near you encourages everyone to follow these preventive tips to keep your vision healthy:
    Get routine eye exams so your eye doctor can inspect for any early signs of disease, which will allow you to receive treatment as early as possible. Early detection is essential for effective treatments to slow or prevent damage to your vision.
  • Know your family eye history and share the facts with your eye doctor.
  • Wear sunglasses whenever you’re outdoors, regardless of the season. Dangerous UV rays are always out there.
  • Don’t smoke; smoking increases your chances of developing age-related macular degeneration and cataracts.
  • Eat nutritiously, including fruits and vegetables and foods high in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon.

Book an eye exam at an eye clinic near you to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you.

EyeCare Associates, your Trumbull eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US

I see fine. Why do I need to see an Eye Doctor?

Regular eye exams are the only way to catch “silent” diseases such as diabetes, glaucoma, and other conditions in their early stages when they’re more easily managed or treated. Many conditions can be discovered in a carefully planned eye exam. Those who consider mass-produced, over-the-counter reading glasses are truly doing themselves a disservice, both financially and medically. One-size-fits-all reading glasses not only do not work well for most people who have a different prescription in each eye, and/or astigmatism, or whose lens and frame parameters are not measured correctly, they bypass the opportunity to have their eyes checked for early detection of many manageable diseases or conditions. For those insisting on selecting glasses not measured specifically for their eyes, headache and eye fatigue are common symptoms.

What are cataracts and how can they be treated?

Cataracts are a clouding of the lens inside the eye. They are common with age, certain medications, and medical conditions. Patients usually feel like they are looking through a dirty window, cannot see colors the way they used to, or have increased difficulty with glare. Currently, the treatment is surgery to remove the cloudy lens. Stay tuned for medical advances in cataract treatment in the future!

What exactly is glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a condition in which the eye’s intraocular pressure (IOP) is too high. This means that your eye has too much aqueous humor in it, either because it produced too much, or because it’s not draining properly. Other symptoms are optic nerve damage and vision loss. Glaucoma is a silent disease that robs the patient of their peripheral vision. Early detection is very important.

Is it possible to prevent Macular Degeneration?

Regular eye exams are the only way to catch “silent” diseases such as diabetes, glaucoma, and other conditions in their early stages when they’re more easily managed or treated. Many conditions can be discovered in a carefully planned eye exam. Those who consider mass-produced, over-the-counter reading glasses are truly doing themselves a disservice, both financially and medically. One-size-fits-all reading glasses not only do not work well for most people who have a different prescription in each eye, and/or astigmatism, or whose lens and frame parameters are not measured correctly, they bypass the opportunity to have their eyes checked for early detection of many manageable diseases or conditions. For those insisting on selecting glasses not measured specifically for their eyes, headache and eye fatigue are common symptoms.

Sports Vision Training Can Help Prevent Scooter Accidents

E Scooter Riders 640When riding an electric scooter, you need to be able to focus on the road, while avoiding cars, pedestrians, and other potential obstacles. It may sound simple, but not everyone has the visual skills needed to focus, scan the surroundings and react in a split-second to an oncoming car or a child who’s run into the street.

At EyeCare Associates, we offer sports vision training, which helps improve visual skills by training the brain to process and respond quickly and efficiently to visual input. This can, in turn, prevent you from getting into an accident.

E-Scooter Riders Need Top-Notch Visual Skills

To stay safe on the road, drivers, motorcyclists, and e-scooter drivers need to have remarkable visual skills, where the ability to focus, track fast-moving objects and react quickly can mean the difference between staying safe and incurring an injury.

Even the smallest increase in processing ability, reaction time and resilience can help prevent injury to yourself and others.

The Visual Skills Needed to Safely Ride an E-Scooter

Improve critical vision skills, such as peripheral awareness, depth perception and eye focusing, with sports vision training, a customized program that improves the communication between your eyes, brain, and body.

1. Peripheral Awareness

Peripheral vision, also known as peripheral awareness, enables us to detect and see things that aren’t right in front of us when looking straight ahead. A well-developed peripheral field helps riders spot people and objects and sense the flow of the road as it changes.

2. Depth Perception

Depth perception is the ability to see in three dimensions and judge the distance between objects or people and yourself.

Those with good depth perception have an easier time accurately tracking any object as it approaches because they can perfectly see where it is in space. This enables one to make split-second decisions about when to swerve or stop to avoid coming in contact with everything from a car to a trash can.

3. Accommodation and Convergence

Accommodation, also known as focus flexibility, is the eyes’ ability to change focus immediately. Convergence is the ability to keep both eyes working in unison as they track people or objects, such as a bus on the road.

Enhancing these eye-focusing skills can boost your ability to concentrate and refocus your vision quickly and more accurately so that you process moving objects quickly.

Want to strengthen your visual skills? Contact our team of eye doctors today!

EyeCare Associates serves patients from Trumbull, Southport, Norwalk, and Stamford, all throughout Connecticut.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Randy Schulman

Q: What is sports vision training?

  • A: Sports vision training is made of individually prescribed and monitored exercises aimed at developing specific visual skills and processing. These various customized activities and exercises retrain the brain to effectively interact with the eyes and improve vision functioning. This therapy consists of weekly in-office appointments and assigned daily exercises, ranging from several weeks to several months. The training involves close monitoring and follow-up appointments to ensure steady improvements in the patient’s visual functions.

Q: Who can benefit from sports vision training?

  • A: Whether you play hockey or baseball or ride an e-scooter, sports vision training is perfect for anyone of any age and ability seeking to take their performance to the next level.


Book An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Living With Keratoconus | Kenneth’s Story

Kenneth’s Story 640From the time Kenneth was 11 years old, he wore glasses to correct his quickly deteriorating vision. He was always forced to sit at the front of the classroom and felt embarrassed by it. This time in his life marked the beginning of seemingly endless visits to various eye doctors to try and figure out what was causing his vision problems.

Four years later, at the age of 15, Kenneth was diagnosed with keratoconus, a progressive eye disease that affects the shape and condition of the cornea. Kenneth was referred by his ophthalmologist to an optometrist who [specializess] in treating keratoconus.

The optometrist explained that keratoconus is a condition that causes the cornea to thin and bulge out in a cone-like shape, leading to visual impairment. The early stages of this progressive eye disease usually cause mild to moderate vision problems that can be corrected with eyeglasses. But as the cornea’s shape continues to distort, glasses are no longer suitable and rigid contact lenses must be prescribed.

The optometrist prescribed rigid gas permeable contact lenses, which significantly improved Kenneth’s vision. But Kenneth sometimes found his contacts hard to manage, and even uncomfortable at times. People would tell him to just ‘switch back to glasses’ and ‘stop wearing the lenses if they give you so much grief.’

That wasn’t possible. He simply couldn’t see without the contacts.

Thankfully, before Kenneth’s condition progressed to the point where cornea surgery was required, new technology gave him fresh hope.

At the age of 20, Kenneth was fitted for scleral contact lenses for the first time. The day of the fitting was an emotional one for him and his family, as he was truly able to see the world around him in detail—and with great comfort.

Kenneth walked out of the optometrist’s practice, looked around, and saw leaves on the trees for the first time in 5 years. Prior to this, his perception of trees were brown stumps with green shrubbery—but never leaves.

He noticed that the cars driving past him on the street looked astonishingly clean. Nothing seemed faded anymore. Colors were vivid, lines were sharp.

The detail and clarity of each object were genuinely overwhelming for him. His mom, who also suffers from keratoconus, was overcome with emotion as she watched her son visually experience his surroundings in a whole new way.

From that day forward, Kenneth’s life changed drastically. His scleral contact lenses enabled him to function normally and achieve his goals. Wearing his sclerals allows him to work, exercise, socialize and be his authentic self.

Kenneth confesses that when he doesn’t wear his sclerals, his entire personality changes. He becomes timid, quiet and apprehensive.

Having keratoconus will no longer hinder Kenneth from living his best life, and it doesn’t have to hinder you or an affected loved one.

To a person with corneal disease, scleral lenses can be truly life-changing. If you or a loved one has keratoconus or other corneal irregularities, contact EyeCare Associates today.

EyeCare Associates serves patients from Trumbull, Southport, Norwalk, and Stamford, all throughout Connecticut.

Q&A

Q: #1: How do scleral lenses work?

  • A: Scleral contact lenses are hard lenses that have a much larger diameter than standard soft contact lenses. They vault over the entire cornea and rest on the sclera (the white of the eye) so that no part of the lens is touching the cornea itself. The lens holds a reservoir of soothing and nourishing fluid between the eye and the lens, providing the best in visual clarity and comfort.

Q: #2: What other conditions do scleral lenses help with?

  • A: Any patient with irregular corneas can benefit from scleral lenses. They’re also suitable for patients with severe dry eye syndrome, as the fluid reservoir helps maintain comfort and ocular hydration. They’re also great for patients with very high refractive errors (high myopia, hyperopia, or astigmatism). Speak to your eye doctor if you think scleral lenses may be right for you.


Book An Appointment
Call Our Offices

5 Vision Therapy Myths Debunked

5 Vision Therapy Myths 640There’s a lot of misinformation out there, especially when it comes to vision therapy — a customized program that trains the eyes and brain to work together more effectively and efficiently.

We are here to dispel those myths.

5 Myths and Facts about Vision Therapy

1. Myth: Vision therapy is just for children

Fact: People of all ages can benefit from vision therapy.

Although vision therapy is widely prescribed for younger patients, many adults have benefited from a personalized vision therapy program. That’s because the basis of vision therapy is neuroplasticity — the brain’s ability to change and learn new habits.

Your brain is capable of forming new neural pathways throughout your entire life, so vision therapy can be effective at any age.

2. Myth: Vision therapy isn’t based on scientific research

Fact: There are numerous scientific studies that prove the effectiveness of vision therapy, funded and published by the National Eye Institute (NEI).

In fact, according to several studies, vision therapy is the most effective treatment for the most common binocular vision problem, convergence insufficiency. Research also supports the efficacy of vision therapy when it comes to lazy eye (amblyopia), eye turn (strabismus), and difficulties related to reading and learning.

3. Myth: All vision therapy is the same

Fact: No two vision therapy treatments are alike. Each patient’s condition is unique and is treated accordingly.

Vision therapists use a host of different exercises, devices, computer programs, lenses, prisms, and other equipment for treatment. Your optometrist will decide which options will benefit your condition.

4. Myth: Eye surgery is the only option for treating eye misalignment

Fact: While surgery may help the eyes appear more aligned, it can’t fully improve binocular function.

In other words, surgery corrects the physical problem of alignment but doesn’t teach the eyes and brain to work together. That’s why vision therapy is often recommended for patients who have had strabismus surgery or are considering it.

5. Myth: I don’t need vision therapy, I have 20/20 eyesight

Fact: Vision therapy has little to do with eyesight, and everything to do with how your eyes function.

Even a person with 20/20 eyesight can have poor tracking skills, eye movement skills, depth perception, and other visual deficits.

In fact, you may have poor visual skills and not even know it. If you experience symptoms like headaches, dizziness, nausea, eyestrain, or difficulty with concentrating and reading, it may be time to have your vision evaluated by a vision therapist to identify any underlying problems related to your visual skills.

To schedule a functional vision evaluation for you or your child, call EyeCare Associates today!

EyeCare Associates serves patients from Trumbull, Southport, Norwalk, Stamford, and throughout Connecticut.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Randy Schulman

Q: #1: What is vision therapy?

  • A: Vision therapy is a program of [curtomized] eye exercises that are performed in-office with an at-home component as well. Vision therapy helps develop the visual system and trains the eyes and brain to work in unison. Duration of treatment varies from patient to patient, as each person responds differently. Speak to us to learn more about what we offer and how we can help.

Q:#2: Is vision therapy covered by insurance?

  • A: Vision therapy may be covered under major medical insurance plans (vision therapy is most often applied to a medical policy as opposed to a vision policy). However, certain insurance companies may deny or place severe limits on coverage for vision therapy as a cost-saving measure. When sorting out the insurance details for vision therapy, it’s important to know what questions to ask of your insurance agent or workplace HR department.


Book An Appointment
Call One of Our 4 Offices

4 Ways Vision May Be Affected Following A Stroke

headache womanAbout 2 in 3 stroke survivors live with some degree of visual dysfunction following the stroke. Although all brains are different and everybody reacts differently, 4 major categories of vision loss can be caused by a stroke.

A stroke can damage any segment of the neural pathway that connects the eyes to the brain or a section of the brain that processes the images the eyes send it. Damage to either area can lead to vision loss.

Stroke-related vision problems can make daily living a challenge, but there is hope for stroke survivors who suffer from visual symptoms.

In honor of World Stroke Awareness Month, we’ll explore 4 types of stroke-related visual problems, and how EyeCare Associates can help.

1. Visual Field Loss

A stroke can damage certain areas of the brain responsible for either central or peripheral vision, causing a portion of the visual field to be lost, causing vision to be ‘blacked-out’ or have ‘blind spots.’

In most cases, the same area of the visual field is lost in both eyes. This condition is called homonymous visual field loss, meaning a person may not be able to see the right or left side of their visual field from each eye.

Affected individuals may have difficulty with reading and may bump into things located in their blind spots.

2. Visual Processing Difficulties

Sometimes, a person may be able to see everything in their visual field but will have problems processing that visual information. For example, they may have the ability to see another person’s face, but might not recognize it. They may also have difficulty identifying or interacting with common objects, affecting daily tasks such as making a cup of coffee.

Visual neglect is the most common type of visual processing problem. People with this condition aren’t aware that they aren’t seeing people or objects on the right or left side of their visual field.

3. Eye Movement Problems

A stroke can damage the delicate nerves that control the eyes’ movements. A person who cannot control their eye nerves may have difficulty moving their eyes in order to shift their focus from one object to the next or have trouble tracking moving objects.

Nystagmus (involuntary and rapid eye movements) is also a possible complication of ocular nerve damage.

If only one eye is affected, the patient will usually experience double or blurred vision. Whether one or both eyes are affected, poor depth perception can result from eye movement dysfunction.

4. Dry Eye Syndrome

Stroke-related muscle weakness is common, especially in the eyes and face. If this occurs, the eyelids may not be able to fully close during blinking or while asleep. This can lead to dry eye syndrome, causing symptoms like red, itchy, watery, burning eyes and light sensitivity.

Fortunately, many of these post-stroke visual symptoms are treatable with neuro-optometric rehabilitation therapy.

A customized neuro-optometric rehabilitation therapy program can help you return to your normal routine, or at least make daily life less challenging.

If you or a loved one have suffered a stroke, speak with our team of eye doctors about getting your vision evaluated to identify deficiencies in the visual system. If a problem is found, we’ll help guide you through all of your treatment options for the best possible outcome.

To schedule your appointment or to learn more about what we offer, call EyeCare Associates today.

serves patients from Trumbull, Southport, Norwalk, Stamford, and throughout Connecticut.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Randy Schulman

Q: #1: What is neuro-optometric rehabilitation therapy?

  • A: Neuro-optometric rehabilitation therapy is a tailor-made program of visual exercises that train the eyes and brain to work together. Treatment can also include specialized lenses, prisms, and filters.

Q: #2: What other conditions can neuro-optometric rehabilitation treat?

  • A: Neuro-optometry can help patients with visual problems due to traumatic brain injury, stroke, physical disabilities and neurological conditions. A neuro-optometrist can help treat binocular vision disorders (BVD), strabismus, diplopia, oculomotor dysfunction, accommodation and convergence problems, and traumatic visual acuity loss.


Book An Appointment
Call One of Our 4 Offices

What Is Myopia?

It’s not a word that most people use every day, but myopia is becoming an increasingly more common condition. Myopia, more commonly known as nearsightedness, is the inability to see objects clearly at a distance.

When it comes to the prevalence of myopia, the statistics are staggering. In the U.S. alone, more than 40 percent of Americans have myopia and that number is increasing at an alarming rate, especially among school-aged children. CooperVision is helping to slow the upward trend in severity through its Brilliant Futures Myopia Management Program featuring MiSight 1 day contact lenses, the first and only FDA-approved contact lens to slow myopia progression of myopia in children (aged 8-12 at the initiation of treatment). A recent clinical study reveals that MiSight 1 day reduced the rate of myopia progression in that age group on average by 59% over a three-year period.

Nine-year-old Phoebe Lee knows the impact myopia can have on daily life. Phoebe had passed all her vision screenings in pre-school, but after her first eye exam at age 7, she was diagnosed with myopia and needed glasses. More concerning, her myopia was rapidly progressing. That’s when Phoebe’s mom, Patty, took her to see a certified Brilliant Futures program eye care practitioner who fitted her with MiSight 1 day. Since then, Phoebe’slife has changed for the better. “Before MiSight, I had trouble seeing the whiteboard and I couldn’t see the ball clearly when I played sports,” she said.“The contact lenses are so easy to use. In the morning, I put them in and I don’t even remember they’re there until I take them out at bedtime.”

For Phoebe’s mom, the Brilliant Futures program offers peace of mind. Phoebe wears MiSight 1 day lenses 6 days a week, 10 hours a day—the recommended amount of time to see the most benefit. “As a parent, you want the very best for your child, and I was determined not to let myopia limit Phoebe’s life,” she explained. “It feels good knowing that her nearsightedness won’t increase as quickly.”

Learn more about Phoebe’s story here: https://coopervision.com/myopia-management.

To learn more or to schedule an appointment, contact our EyeCare Associates practice.

Call One of Our 4 Locations
Schedule an Eye Exam