Skip to main content

TRUMBULL
6515 Main Street, Suite 8L
Trumbull, CT 06611

SOUTHPORT
2600 Post Road
Southport, CT 06890

NORWALK
444 Westport Avenue
Norwalk, CT 06851

STAMFORD
1425 Bedford Street
Stamford, CT 06905

Trumbull
203-457-8799
Southport
203-457-8663
Norwalk
203-457-8544
Stamford
203-457-8744
Home » What's New » Mental Health and Your Vision

Mental Health and Your Vision

mental-health-vision_640x350

May is Mental Health Awareness Month in the USA; in Canada, Mental Health week is May 6th to 12th. Since 1949, it has been observed throughout the United States as a way of drawing attention to the importance of proper mental health. This year’s theme is #4Mind4Body. The idea is that using elements around us, such as the people in our lives, faith, nature, and even pets, can strengthen wellness and overall mental health.

Did you know that your vision can affect your mental health? While things like stress, trauma, and family history are factors that impact mental health, vision can also impact it.

How Does Vision Affect Mental Health?

Certain types of eye diseases and visual impairments can lead to emotional problems like anxiety and depression. This is particularly common in cases of severe vision loss. Patients with glaucoma, macular degeneration, or diabetic retinopathy, for example, can experience mild to acute vision loss. This can make everyday activities like driving, running errands, watching TV, using a computer, or cooking, a difficult and painful experience. When this happens, it can cause a loss of independence, potentially leaving the person mentally and emotionally devastated.

Like most surgical procedures, LASIK corrective surgery is permanent and irreversible. Although it has very high success rates, LASIK has been considered the cause of depression and mental health issues in a few instances.

Kids’ Vision and Mental Health

Increased screen time among school-age children and teens has been shown to reduce emotional stability and cause repeated distractions and difficulty completing tasks, while also increasing the likelihood of developing nearsightedness.

Kids with visual problems often experience difficulty in school. If they can’t see the board clearly or constantly struggle with homework due to poor vision, they may act out their frustration or have trouble getting along with their peers.

Coping with Vision Problems

One of the most important ways to cope with visual problems is awareness. Simply paying attention to the signs and symptoms — whether the patient is an adult or a child — is a crucial first step. 

Family members, close friends, colleagues, parents, and teachers can all play an important role in detecting emotional suffering in those with visual difficulties. Pay attention to signs of changes in behavior, such as a loss of appetite, persistent exhaustion, or decreased interest in favorite activities.

Thankfully, many common vision problems are treatable. Things like double vision, hyperopia (farsightedness), myopia (nearsightedness), amblyopia (lazy eye), and post-concussion vision difficulties can be managed. Vision correction devices, therapeutic lenses, visual exercises, or special prism glasses may help provide the visual clarity you need. Your primary eye doctor can help and a vision therapist or low vision expert may make a significant impact on your quality of life.

How You Can Help

There are some things you can do on your own to raise awareness about good mental health:

Speak Up

Often, just talking about mental health struggles can be incredibly empowering. Ask for help from family and friends or find a local support group. Be open and honest about what you’re going through and talk with others who are going through the same thing. Remember: you’re not alone.

If you experience any type of sudden changes to your vision — even if it’s temporary — talk to your eye doctor. A delay in treatment may have more serious consequences, so speak up and don’t wait.

Get Social

Developing healthy personal relationships improves mental health. People with strong social connections are less likely to experience severe depression and may even live longer. Go out with friends, join a club, or consider volunteering.

Have an Animal

Having a pet has been shown to boost mental health and help combat feelings of loneliness. Guide dogs can be especially beneficial for people suffering from vision loss.

Use Visual Aids

If you or a loved one is experiencing mental health issues caused by vision loss, visual aids can help. Devices like magnifiers or telescopic lenses can enlarge text, images, and objects, so you can see them more clearly and in greater detail.

Kids can benefit from vision correction like glasses, contacts, or specialized lenses for more severe cases of refractive errors. Vision therapy may be an option, too. It is a customized program of exercises that can improve and strengthen visual functions.

Always talk to your eye doctor about any concerns, questions, or struggles. 

Thanks to programs like Mental Health Awareness Month, there is less of a stigma around mental health than just a few decades ago. Advancements in medical technologies and scientific research have led to innovative solutions for better vision care.

During this Mental Health Awareness Month, share your share your struggles, stories, and successes with others. Use the hashtag #Mind4Body and give your loved ones hope for a healthy and high quality of life.

 

x

Dear Valued Patient,

With all the news and information coming out about the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), we are taking necessary precautions to ensure the health and safety of you as our patient, our staff, and our community. In addition, we are continuously checking for updates from both the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the American Optometric Association (AOA) on guidelines as to what, we as your health care provider must do and be aware of. All of our offices are diligently practicing proper hygiene through handwashing by both the optometrists and staff, and the disinfecting of all of our equipment and surfaces in the waiting room, pre-testing, optical, and exam rooms.

In addition, we are advising any of our patients with flu-like symptoms including fever, cough, and shortness of breath to stay home, as well as those who have traveled to any country on the CDC advisory list in the last 14 days. For those who are not experiencing any of the symptoms listed above, we advise taking similar precautionary measures such as washing your hands often and disinfecting and cleaning any frequently touched surfaces.

If you are considering changing or cancelling an upcoming appointment please call one of our offices and discuss options with a friendly staff member. Your health and safety is a priority to us, so any same day cancellations due to illness will not be subjected to a $50 cancellation fee due to the circumstances. Otherwise, we look forward to your visit and will hopefully see you soon! For more information on COVID-19, ways to stay healthy, and what to look out for, please visit the CDC.gov.

Thank You, Eye Care Associates, P.C.